The Sicilian Briton

Reposting because it continues to have relevance and I continue to find the Sicilian Briton a fascinating man.

uppitymonkey

I finally found my history book, the Age of Arthur, by John Morris. I read this a long time ago, a very good read, but one individual and his words stood out.

The Sicilian Briton was an unknown monk who wrote about the unfairness of wealth versus poverty and ranted against the rich and powerful. Considering the mood of today, I find his words even more pertinent. I’m not convinced I agree with everything he has said, but here are some lines that really strike home and could apply to any time period. Ours especially.

“Listen to your rich man calling your poor man ‘wretch’, ‘beggar’, ‘rabble’, because he dares to open his mouth in ‘our’ presence, because in his rags he reproaches ‘our’ morality and conduct, … as if the rich alone had a right to speak, as if the understanding of truth were a function of wealth, not of thought.”

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May 30, 2016: New-look Android! New cast members!

Really looking forward to this show coming back

Josephmallozzi's Weblog

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Interesting.  I came across this photo of our lovable Android over on Syfy.com. Among the other goodies, the site offers a breakdown of the season 2 cast and Raza crew including…

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Melanie’s Liburd’s Nyx Harper and…

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Shaun Sipos’ young medic, Devon.

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In addition, there’s are new pics of some familiar faces accompanied by character descriptions and a little background on each cast member.  Check it out!

http://www.syfy.com/darkmatter/cast/2

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In addition, there’s a season 1 refresher – but only for those who have already seen it.

http://www.syfy.com/darkmatter/photos/season-one-101

For everyone else, there’s still time to binge Dark Matter’s first season on Netflix or over on Syfy.com!

Screen Shot 2016-05-30 at 7.12.26 AMFinally, while on the Syfy site, you can also peruse this rundown of The Raza crew – and what we know about them…

http://www.syfy.com/darkmatter/photos/character-gallery

Meanwhile, @AdamSquareOne offers his own Dark Matter fan primer:

Hang in there!  Approximately one month to our Dark Matter season 2 premiere!

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Females with Aspergers Syndrome Checklist by Samantha Craft

My wife showed me this, citing it as highly revealing about herself and her Aspergers. I think that it deserves sharing around for that alone.

Everyday Aspie

me

Females with Asperger’s Syndrome Unofficial Checklist 

This is an unofficial checklist created by an adult female with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) who has a son with Asperger’s Syndrome. Samantha Craft has a Masters Degree in Education. Samantha Craft does not hold a doctorate in Psychiatry or Psychology. She has a life-credential as a result of being a female with Asperger’s Syndrome and being a parent of a child with Asperger’s Syndrome. She has created this list in an effort to assist health professionals in recognizing Asperger’s Syndrome in females—for in-depth information regarding females with AS refer to Craft’s upcoming book Everyday AspergersTen Traits of Aspergers can be found here.

Suggested Use: Check off all areas that strongly apply to the person. If each area has 75%-80% of the statements checked, or more, then you may want to consider that the female may have Asperger’s Syndrome.

When determining an AS…

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Rabbit Wars

For some reason Watership Down gets played at Easter. Nothing to do with the Christian or Pagan celebration. Just because it has rabbits in. Which is fine by me because that film is one of my all time favourites.

What I wanted to say here was that today, having seen the film was on television and getting into the last third of it, as I always do, I felt compelled to grab the book and read a bit. I was looking for something, I can’t quite remember what. I think Bigwig taking a swing at Campion just because Woundwort wondered if he could take him. Such a typical Bigwig moment.

Anyway, I sent the afternoon skim reading the last part of the book.

If you’re a fan of the film and not read the book, I highly recommend you do. It is well written, not hard to read or follow at all and gives a lot more insight into the characters. Especially the Efrafans.

The book helps us get to know various members of the so-called bad guys. We find some are vicious, like Vervain, and others are only following orders, like Groundsel and Ragwort. Then we have Campion, a loyal captain and yet also someone the good guys respect, because he’s always ready to throw himself into the mud and dark along with his patrol. Campion seems a noble and brave rabbit, whose loyalty to Woundwort keeps him from questioning him.

Woundwort himself is much more than a 2D villain. Even the film gives some glimmers of this. But not much. In the book, we understand Woundwort. Losing his family while young, witnessing his mother be killed, he became ferocious. He went looking for fights. They say, later on in the story, that they think he was unlike any other rabbit. Their natural instinct was to run and hide. He wanted to fight. He wanted to make rabbits safe by making them strong and fearsome. He did this by personally leading and inspiring them. Hell, even Bigwig, for as much as he loathes the regime under the General, admires him for his ability to command. Woundwort leads where others fear to go, and so becomes an admirable but brutal adversary.

The other thing to mention is that the book explores the life in Efrafa much deeper than the film can. That does manage to tell us that their society is breaking down, but in the book we see it for all it is – the good and the bad. Woundwort took over the warren, then moulded it into his image. They feared him, yet many under him respected him and some even admired him. He made them feel strong. Gave them hope.

His society is one of strength and stealth. Rules are ruthlessly enforced. Rabbits can’t even shit where they want, for fear of leaving signs of where they live. Woundwort honed his warren to be one where everything is for the good of the community. Everyone has their place, has their role. You do your job, don’t cause a fuss, and things will go well. In fact, this harsh life has helped them flourish, to the point where Efrafa is overcrowded.

That’s what is so interesting about this society. It is one where the individual wants and wishes are overridden, and it works, but many feel miserable and resentful. Woundwort keeps it together, but you can already see the cracks. It is a facist/communist society. There is a secret police of sorts, led by the reviled Vervain. No one can leave. Order must be maintained. Promotion is highly sought after for the prestige and the rewards. But also many do believe in their way of life and want to do well for their people.

I loved this mention I came across today. After Bigwig helps some escape to Watership Down, there is an incident between him and Blackavar, who he helped escape. Blackavar warns him of something going wrong and Bigwig doesn’t listen, so after it has, he lets Blackavar know he should have listened to him. Blackavar says he has no idea what he is talking about. Turns out, in Efrafa, lessers are so deeply taught to follow their betters, that if a subordinate gives advice that isn’t heeded, he or she will forget about it. Basically, Blackavar genuinely has put that out of his mind, because he can’t show up his better. To him, Bigwig was never wrong, never ignored his warning. Efrafa breeds strong rabbits who are ranging wide across the land, but there is a weakness in their heads and hearts.

As I said, it is a fascinating depiction. A society that flourishes because of its own brutal and regimented nature, and yet is suffering for it too. Woundwort led them to greatness, but then kept them in his grasp. He wanted to stay in charge at any cost. He didn’t believe anyone else could do what he had. Maybe he was right.

Anyway, I love the film, with its melodic score at times and intense drumbeat at others, and the comedy and gore, yet the book is a must read. Woundwort and his followers are more colourful and more intriguing. I feel the story benefits as the world is shown to us via more than one group of characters. Differing views, challenging philosophies, conflicting personalities = more fascinating and engaging story.

I know they’re just rabbits, yet Woundwort and Bigwig remain two of my favourite characters and are a big influence on my writing. Their bloody showdown – depicted with more tactical thought and personal fear in the book – was everything those two promised us. I can only hope to deliver the same one day.

Breaking news: Lambeth demolition decision quashed

Reblog for victory!

Save Cressingham Gardens

Residents are celebrating a victory against their local authority landlord after a judge quashed its unlawful decision to demolish up to 300 homes at the High Court.

Lambeth Council was said to have “nobbled” its own Cabinet committee by calling off a consultation on refurbishment of Cressingham Gardens Estate in Tulse Hill, without carrying out the proper financial analysis.

In court, the council admitted deliberately downplaying the voice of opposition to the redevelopment of the “congenial, low crime” 1970’s estate, in a town hall report summarising residents’ views. The local authority left out resident feedback including on proposed alternative funding strategies, which it claimed were “not pertinent”.

The two-day hearing earlier this month also featured a mysterious memo, which the council claimed was the “show-stopping” document which proved the repairs were unaffordable – but was nothing of the sort.

David Wolfe, QC, for claimant Eva Bokrosova, a tenant on the estate, said: “Where’s the detailed…

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Trident? “Yes, Prime Minister” , because it’s the very best, most pointless that you can buy.

Want to reblog this for two reasons. One, it was a great show. Two, this reasoning and debate still goes on.

Think Left

Sir Humphrey tries to convince the Prime Minister why he must spend money on the very best nuclear weapons which we won’t use, because …. well because …

Sir Humphrey tries to convince Prime Minister Jim Hacker that he must buy Trident because Britain needs the best nuclear deterrent available because the Soviets can’t certainly know that Hacker probably knows that they probably certainly know…

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Techniques of neutralisation: David Cameron’s excuses for Iain Duncan Smith

Contempt abounds in Cameron’s response:

Politics and Insights

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Iwrote earlierabout the way the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) heavily micro-managed the recent Mortality Statistics release, and how the Government are using an excessively bureaucratic approach to ensure that no inferences are drawn from the data published, insisting that it’s “wrong” to link the mortality rates of sick and disabled people with punitive, Conservative austerity policies.

However, the accounts and experiences of sick and disabled people and their families (recorded in the media, in parliamentary inquiries, Commons debates – all preserved on the Hansard record) inform us that there is a clear correlation between the Tory “reforms” and increased distress, a loss of dignity and autonomy, financial insecurity and insolvency, increasing ill health, and sometimes, the death, of disabled people.

When confronted in the Commons, Iain Duncan Smith and other ministers dispensed with civilised debate, and simply blocked any discussion regarding concerns raised by the opposition…

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