Farewell to an Inspiration

So Terry Pratchett has just died and, while we all knew this was coming, I’m upset and also a bit angry that someone so smart and skilled as a writer and thinker has gone. This is one of my authors, the ones I read devotedly and still revere. His books were sat on a shelf with David Gemmell’s and theirs only. So here’s my emotional splurge I just threw onto Facebook:

Pratchett wasn’t just funny, he was damn smart as a writer (and person). His mysteries were really good. The plot about poisoning the Patrician, where he puts it right in front of the reader but you (well, me) don’t see it until all is revealed is sublimely done. The fact Gaspode would say woof, not go woof, was a bit of humour that also showed you how nuanced a description can be.
Granny Weatherwax is one of the strongest female characters I’ve ever come across. Gender identity among dwarves was played out and resolved with amusing maturity. Rincewind is more of an inspiration due to being a coward, not a hero. Assassins wouldn’t dress all in black because that would actually show up too well in the darkness. Camels were brilliant mathematicians, dubbed You Bastard. Words had power, ideas could become more real than reality itself, and gods depended on believers, not the other way around.
David Gemmell, and also Janrae Frank later on, taught me how to write heroic fantasy, although I’m a poor imitator of both. Pratchett taught me how to write comedy, how to write smart with comedy, and how that even an orang-utan or the Death of Rats can become an interesting character.

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Support The Sweets Way Occupation, Let’s Take Our Cities Back

Well this is just horrific:

the void

How the fuck is a child supposed to understand why they don’t have a home? These are kids who see their parents going out to work long hours for shit wages, or battling illness, or struggling to find work. They see a parent who loves them, cares for them, feeds them – who does all the things that a parent is supposed to do – and yet that is not enough. The most basic form of human security, even survival, is now fast becoming something only the affluent can afford in many parts of the UK.

Almost every day seems to bring another story of low income families being forced from their homes to make way for luxury flats, as property developers turn the ground we walk on into a chance for them to increase their millions. And if anyone complains than the rich simply call on the machinery of…

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Another Rotten Sequel

So a while ago I posted about movies that piss me off, which pretty much consisted of sequels and remakes.

Well now I have another to add to that list:

The Last Exorcism: Part Two.

Now the first one wasn’t perfect. I didn’t like where it ended up, for various reasons. But overall it was a really good film. The main character was a highly likable individual who you grew to care about. There was plenty of ambiguity, if you really suspect something is up so you lean toward genuine possession. The reveal for what is truly going on is a wonderfully subtle and simple one liner. The ambiguity is my favourite part of the movie, I was really guessing all the way, and then that is thrown out at the end. That’s mainly why I dislike the ending. Still, overall I really appreciated that film a lot.

I have just watched the second. Okay, so I didn’t expect it to be anything that good, but it is a feeble cashgrab with jump scares (well, attempted ones) and an ending that made the first film’s conclusion shine with ingenuity by comparison. It was good to see the actress back and she’s pretty good in both, but this film reminds me of those other sequels I despise because it feels so different from the original. Where the first film was an interesting and different horror film, driven mainly by the main character’s charm and likability, your concern for the girl and your questions about the situation overall, this is just spooky shit happens, then more, then some stuff, and then end. Noting new, nothing impressive. No interesting characters. It feels like exactly what it is, a bland addition to a strong movie for bucks. Which irks me. It was boring, it was obvious and it gave me no humanity to fear for or real threat to fear. So I felt it was worth mentioning along with the list I had presented before, although I don’t think it would make it.

It would sit well with the Descent Two. Pointless, bland, generic, lacking any of the first’s personality, and a sequel you really didn’t think the first would ever lead to.